Why go on a Kenya Safari?

Kenya Safari

Kenya packs a lot in: Best wildlife attractions in Africa, coral reefs and beaches, mountains and deserts and tribal culture that are just colorful. There are more than a million reasons for you to visit Kenya. Stunning     beautiful landscapes just sets the scene, starting from the rainforest of Kakamega to the beaches of Indian Ocean by way of The National Park of Mt Kenya; Maasai Mara’s rolling grass to the shores of the Jade sea where we have a searing desert; With the Great Rift Valley, which is the home to Hell’s Gate National Park, cleaving a immense wound through it all.

Great Annual Wildebeest Migration
The mainstay for Kenya’s visit for decades has been Wildlife safaris, and also the many available Kenyan parks such as Tsavo National Park, which is one of the best places in Africa to see, Leopards, Lion Elephants and the famous migration of wildebeest, it also has cliffs that are awesome for climbing. Kenya is rated to be among the top five destinations for bird watching in the world; Maasai Mara which is know

n globally for its exceptional number of lions, cheetahs and leopards, and also the Zebra migration, wildebeest and Thomson’s gazelle to and from Serengeti each year from July to October ,this is famously known as the Great Migration. The same can be seen in both Kenya and Tanzania in our various Kenya Safari And Tanzania Tour packages. Taking a walk in the Mt Kenya’s glacial ridges is an outdoor activity that will make you to have fun and enjoy yourself. You can also trek in Aberdares, Cherangani ranges and Mau.

Masai Warriors Kenya

Kenya also offers cultural experiences as it is a Nation with many tribes; The people in Kenya represent a wider cross section of all the things that are mainly Africa, urban families and traditional tribes; modern sensibilities and ancient customs are brought together by everyday life. River Athi and river Tana have sections that are fit for rafting after the rains; For activities based on water such as scuba driving, windsurfing, kite surfing, deep sea fishing or snorkeling one can always head to coastline of Indian Ocean. You can do horse riding in Central Highlands.

Kenya Safari
Here are some of the highlights in Kenya

Going on safari-There are over 20 managed national reserves and game parks in Kenya. The most popular destination for safaris includes:

  • Watching the migration of Wildebeest-Also known as the “Greatest wildlife show on earth” The most popular park in Kenya being Maasai Mara, and you cab be a witness of the incredible migration of wildebeest and zebra from July-October each year from Serengeti.
  • Amboseli-Among the best wildlife viewing experience
  • Lake Nakuru-known for Flamingos
  • Aberdere-provides habitat for black rhino, monkeys, leopards and lions.
  • Tsavo West and East-One of the world’s largest game reserves and oldest parks in Kenya, popular for its stunning viewing.
  • Visiting the tribal villages-The most colorful and famous tribes are the Maasai. You should be aware of being milked at some of these villages.
  • Climbing Mount Kenya-You will have to be an expert climber to reach the summit (5,199 meters).kenya_mombasa
  • Visiting the coastal towns of Mombasa, Malindi, Lamu -Where Swahili is a distinct culture of Arabic and Africa.
  • Explore the City of Nairobi-Despite its faintly name, it still has sights that are interesting such as the Maasai Market and the National Museum of Nairobi which is said to have some of theoldest remains of mankind.

With all that information, its now time to park your luggage and come visit Kenya for a an incredible life time experience.

The Earth Safari

http://www.theearthsafari.com

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Categories: Africa, Holiday, Kenya, knowledge, Nature, Safari, Travel, Wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Wildlife Photography Tips

The Earth Safari

Nature and wildlife photography is a photographic discipline that encompasses a wide range of subject matter. Some nature and wildlife photographers focus on beautiful pictures of impressive landscapes…even stitching photos together to create wide, stunning panoramic images.

Most wildlife photographers , though, have to go to places like parks, free-roaming zoos, and wildlife reserves in search of wildlife subjects to photograph.

Those photographers who are lucky enough to live near game reserves or large lakes are especially blessed with great opportunities to capture photos of animals in their own natural habitat.

There is something immensely satisfying about photographing wildlife and nature.

In many cases, it requires a great deal of patience and persistence to get the image that you want…sometimes the only way is a lot of trial and error.

Animals and wildlife don’t pose for the camera or take direction, so it can be very challenging to get a great shot. Sometimes, it’s simply a matter of good luck more than anything else!

Wildlife photography also requires photographers to develop their skills and knowledge of their tools of the trade. Skills such as adding or changing lenses for the proper focal length…depending on whether they are photographing a bumble bee or a moose.

Even the basics such as learning to adjust the flash, ISO, and exposure time properly to capture images in less than perfect lighting conditions, such as in a dimly lit forest.

Probably the most compelling reason people are drawn to photographing nature and wildlife is that it provides an opportunity to connect with our natural world.

These Wildlife Photography Tips will help you take better animal pictures on your wildlife safari

Lighting : Top lighting effect is not ideal for photographing wildlife or landscapes; low side lighting is better for showing detail in wildlife subjects and creates more interesting shadows in landscapes. So it’s important to make full use of the light at sunrise and again in the later afternoon. While most wildlife photographs are taken with the sunlight behind the photographer thereby fully lighting the subject, it should be remembered that some spectacular images can be taken using side or back lighting, particularly using the warm glow created at sunrise and sunset.

Exposure : Correct exposure is the key to successful photography and modern cameras, with their built-in metering systems, go a long way to reducing the possibility of incorrect exposure. However there are situations where even the most complex metering system is going to struggle. A good example would be a white bird on very dark background, the meter is likely to try and expose correctly for the background, which will over exposure the bird. This is where a good understanding of your camera comes into play. Most SLR cameras will have a +/- (over/under exposure) override and, in the situation outlined above, you will need to under expose by about 1 to 2 stops to ensure correct exposure. The same effect can be obtained by doubling the (ISO) film speed i.e. 100 to 200ISO, but remember to change these setting back before moving on.

In any situation where you are not sure about the exposure you can always bracket. For example if your metering reading is 1/60th at f8, take one picture at this setting, then two further exposures at 1/60th at f11 and 1/60th at f5.6, to do this you may have to switch the camera to manual mode or use the +/- override.

Depth of Field : When the camera lens is focused to give a sharp image of a particular subject, other objects, closer or further away, do not appear equally as sharp. They can be made sharp by ‘stopping down’ using a smaller ‘f stop’. The higher the ‘f stop’ number, the more depth of field is available. It should be remembered that as you stop down your shutter speed will get slower and subject movement will become more of a problem.

‘Stopping down’ is important when photographing plants, insects and other small subjects as it reduces out of focus distractions. The opposite procedure can be used to help isolate your main center of interest by making background or foreground distractions go out of focus.

Don’t forget that you can check the depth of field created by any given ‘f stop’, by using the depth of field button on your camera, This button allows you to preview the finished image though the view finder and to make adjustments to your own satisfaction prior to making any exposure.

Shutter Speed : Different shutter speeds produce varying effects with regard to subject blur and camera shake. Fast shutter speeds are desirable for stopping movement, such as flying birds and eliminating camera shake. It is worth remembering that is some situations movement of the subject during exposure can often result in a pleasing pictorial image.

Composition : The automation of modern cameras has taken away most of the technical pit falls of photography. Composition is the tool by which we can express our artistic thoughts and so demands an active input. It is therefore in your own interest to be fully conversant with the factors relating to good composition. Many newcomers to photography tend to produce all their images in a horizontal format, partly because of the layout of modern cameras which lend themselves to this shape. Remember they work equally well when turned through 90 degrees to a vertical format.

Changing your viewpoint can totally alter your image, we get used to seeing everything from a standing position, by kneeling or even lying down you are going to show an angle that we are not familiar with, which will often produce a more unusual result. A wide-angle lens used in this way can create some very interesting effects.

Think about where you are going to place the main point of interest in your image, avoid placing your subject in the center of the frame. If it’s an animal, it needs room to move or to look into the picture space. A flying bird should be flying into the picture rather than out of it. Always attempt to get a ‘highlight’ in the eye, as this gives life to the subject. Do pay attention to the horizon line, particularly in landscapes and avoid splitting your picture in half, think in ‘thirds’. Zoom lenses have become a great asset by allowing control over subject size and perspective, with out moving the camera position.

By utilizing a range of lenses it is often possible to secure an interesting sequence of images of an animal. The longest lenses for a close up of the head, through to a wide angle, which will show the landscape.

Blur The Background: This is one of those wildlife photography tips that is particularly handy on a safari because often there is vegetation in the image that is distracting and blurring it gives more emphasis to the wildlife subject. If you are photographing a herd of elephant you might want to make sure that they are all in focus so you will try and limit the blurring present in the scene.
The fancy name to describe the portion of the scene that appears sharp throughout the whole image is depth of field. But more important then knowing what it’s called is knowing how to control it. Three factors affect depth of field: the aperture, the focal length of the lens, and the camera to subject distance.
Of these three, the aperture is the one that you have the most control over on a safari. A big aperture opening (e.g f/4.5) will lead to more background blurring while a small aperture (e.g f/22) will lead to the overall scene being sharper.
Remember which is which by matching up the similar first letters, so Big = Blurred and Small = Sharp. That tends to limit the confusion to a minimum. Make sure you know how to change the aperture opening on your gear before you go on safari.
Focus on the Eyes: A wildlife photograph where the subjects eyes are out of focus loses a lot of its appeal. The reason is probably that we as humans are naturally drawn towards looking at eyes and if you can’t see them due to blurring it’s a little jarring.
Whatever the reason, always keep the eyes of your subject in focus and if you can capture the sun glinting in the pupil you get bonus points because that really livens up the picture.
Create Active Space: Leave space for animals to move into when you frame your images. This may seem like one of the obvious wildlife photography tips but in the heat of the moment it’s easy to forget the basics.
Use a Beanbag or Window Mounted Tripod: Hand holding your camera in safari wildlife photography is often a luxury because of the large lenses which magnify every vibration and the low light of dawn and dusk when the subjects are most active. So some kind of rest to lean your camera equipment on is a very good idea to keep your pictures pin sharp.
Most of your photography on safari will be done from inside a vehicle so a tripod to stabilize your camera is impractical. A beanbag does the job very well and it’s very quick to set up. Simply place it on a convenient surface, rest your camera lens on it and click away.
In open safari vehicles, a clamp onto an armrest or seat back is just what the doctor ordered to minimize blur. In closed vehicles, you can make use of window mounts. It’s a little more inconvenient than a bean bag because you need to affix the camera to the mount each time you want to take a photo (the mount stays fixed to the window while you drive) but it does the job well.
Know Your Gear Before You Go: Buying or renting a new camera and/or lens shortly before going on safari is not a good idea if you don’t have time to practice and get some experience with it.
A safari is not the best time to learn because wildlife is unpredictable and often they aren’t going to give you enough time to fiddle with the camera settings and setup before they disappear into the undergrowth. So you need a reasonable amount of practice with your camera and lens so that you can do things quickly.
Also, it will be a huge disappointment if you go all the way to India and Africa and your safari pictures are not as good as they should be because you are inexperienced with your equipment. A safari is often a one time trip so you won’t get any second chances. Make sure you are well acquainted with your equipment before you go.
Visit your local zoo or safari park to prepare. Pets also make excellent subjects to test your photographic skills on.

Notes : Either date and or number each film, using an indelible felt tip pen. Then, by keeping details notes of what you saw each day, you will then be able to accurately caption your photographs.

Code of Conduct : It should always be remembered that the welfare of the subject is more important the photograph. Do not go too close, Do not use flash if it might disturb the subject, Do not make lots of noise. Do not discard any form of litter. Take only pictures leave only memories!
The beauty of the natural world inspires us and frequently takes our breath away. So when we can capture that feeling or effect with beautiful nature photography, it’s just an incredible sense of achievement!

The Earth Safari Team

www.theearthsafari.com

Categories: India, photography, Wildlife photography | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The most luxurious lodges in Africa

Following the announcement of the Royal engagement between Kate Middleton and Prince William, the spotlight has very much been on Kenya’s Lewa Wildlife Conservancy. The private reserve, in the Laikipia region of the East African nation, served as the perfect romantic retreat for the future King of England to propose to his long term girlfriend. There can be few experiences more intimate and idealistic than whiling away the hours with a loved one in an exclusive African lodge. There is something so special about this mysterious place, something enrapturing, hypnotizing even, and as anyone who has visited the continent will testify, utterly unforgettable. The rhythm of the African drum will beat in your heart long after your departure.

We have decided to take a closer look at some of Africa’s, other, luxurious lodges; alternatives if you will, to the William and Kate experience. Perhaps someday soon you might be sharing your own special moment, with bended knee or not, in luxury Lodges.

Shambala Game Reserve, South Africa Tucked away in the stunning Waterberg Mountains, Shambala consists of 10,000 hectares of pristine South African countryside; a place that, though relatively small compared to other reserves, still boasts the chance to see Africa’s elusive ‘Big Five’, (Lions, Elephants, Leopards, Rhinos and Buffalos). As well as its animal interests the reserve also has a human heart at its core, a family run cultural village which acts as a living, breathing information center where visitors can learn all about South Africa’s incredible history. The accommodation is preoccupied with authenticity and tradition, the Zulu camp, consisting of six fantastically appointed Zulu Huts, offers five-star accommodation but with a real sense of cultural legitimacy. All of the huts come with spacious double bedrooms and full shower facilities, providing all the comfort you might need to create some magical memories.

Chobe Game Lodge, Botswana – The only permanently fixed lodge within the Chobe National Park, the site is perfectly located along the Chobe River to observe the largest concentration of elephants in Africa. The sleek lines and elegant qualities of the lodge’s Moorish architecture create a sense of light and space; the typical features which include high arches, barrel-vaulted ceilings and tiled floors all contribute towards a clean and classic aesthetic. The 47 rooms are adorned with original African paintings and carvings, retaining a real sense of place as well as boasting all of the comforts of modern living; the accommodation’s considered design also makes it ideal for families and children.

Sossusvlei Desert Lodge, Namibia – Sossusvlei is quite literally a desert oasis, nestled between the spectacular dunes of the Namib Desert and the jagged outcrops of the rocky escarpment. You’ll feel like you’re really part of the African experience when you stay at Sossusvlei, where the ten individual villas constructed out of stone and glass offer the perfect symmetry between modern minimalist design and traditional African design. All are air conditioned to keep you fresh during the day and cosy fireplaces have been installed for those cooler winter nights. Despite being located on the periphery of a desert there is still an incredible array of wildlife to be seen, including the iconic oryx, Hartmann’s mountain zebras, antelopes, springbok and smaller mammals such as the bat-eared fox, aardwolf and porcupine.

Thanda Game Reserve, South Africa Thanda, a word derived from the Zulu for love, was awarded the prize of ‘World’s Leading Luxury Lodge’ at the recent World Travel Awards. Thanda offers a range of accommodation to suit all budgets and tastes, from the opulence of the royal private villas or the warmth of the main lodge to the rugged refinement of the tented camp. Located 23 kilometers north of Hluhluwe in Zululand, the reserve is a tribute to South African cultural heritage, and as a romantic sanctuary of peace and tranquility, many would consider it peerless in all of Africa. Catering for adults and children alike, it boasts fine dining and a wellness center, were natural holistic approaches to treatment will leave you feeling revived and refreshed. Let’s not also forget the wildlife, the big five are at your doorstep and because the reserve is so close to the Indian Ocean, horse riding on the nearby beaches or a trip to the Isimangaliso wetlands are also a must.

The Earth Safari Team

www.theearthsafari.com

Categories: Africa, beautiful, Botswana, Conservation, earth, Eco tourism, Holiday, hotels, lodges, Namibia, Nature, photography, resorts, Safari, South Africa, Tourism, Travel, Uncategorized, Wildlife, world | Tags: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Top 10 Safari Destinations in Africa

Africa’s top wildlife safari destinations include wildlife parks in Kenya , Tanzania , Uganda , South Africa , Botswana , Zimbabwe ,Zambia , Namibia and Gabon. If you’re looking for the best safari where you’re almost guaranteed to see the “Big Five” you can’t go wrong with these choices.

1. Masai Mara National Reserve – Kenya

Kenya is Africa’s most popular safari destination and the Masai Mara Reserve is the most popular wildlife park in Kenya. From July – October you can witness the incredible migration of millions of wildebeest and zebra. The Maasai tribesman also offer cultural tours which will enhance your experience.

2. Chobe National Park – Botswana

Chobe National park lies in Botswana’s Okavango Delta and covers four distinct Eco-systems. The Savuti marsh in particular offers some of the highest concentrations of wildlife in Africa year round. Chobe boasts around 120,000 elephants, you’re unlikely to miss them when you enjoy a safari here.

The best time to visit Chobe is between May and September, the dry, cooler winter months. Herds of zebra, eland, buffalo, giraffe and wildebeest congregate around the Savuti marsh this time of year. Chobe is accessible by car which makes it a little less expensive than some other Botswana Parks. There’s a wide variety of accommodation available to suit all budgets, you can even rent a houseboat.

3. Kruger National Park – South Africa

Kruger National Park in South Africa boasts the highest variety of wildlife in Africa which includes the Big Five, hippos, crocodiles, cheetah and more. Kruger is one of the best maintained parks in Africa which means it’s ideal for a self-drive safari.

4. South Luangwa National Park – Zambia

Home of the “walking safari” South Luangwa National Park in Zambia offers a true African experience. There’s plenty of wildlife and over 400 species of birds. The Luangwa river is filled to the brim with hippos and if you’re lucky you’ll spot prides of over 30 lions at a time. There are 60 different animal species and over 400 different bird species living in the National Park.

South Luangwa offers both budget and luxury safari lodging. The best time to visit is during the dry season from April to October. Near the end of the dry season, the animals really concentrate around the remaining waterholes, which makes for a great safari.

5. Serengeti National Park – Tanzania

The Serengeti National Park in Tanzania offers the absolute classic African safari setting. The grasslands make the Serengeti fantastic for spotting lion kills because you can see the whole spectacle clearly. The migration of millions of wildebeest and zebra starts here and because it’s much larger than the Mara (see above), it is also less touristy.

6. Bwindi Impenetrable Forest – Uganda

Bwindi Impenetrable Forest in Uganda is home to almost half of the world’s population of mountain gorillas. Besides offering a wonderful backdrop to Gorilla tracking, you can also see chimpanzees, and many other mammals. Bwindi has been designated a World Heritage Site.

7. Etosha Natonal Park – Namibia

Etosha National Park is Namibia’s top wildlife destination. Etosha is home to Africa’s tallest elephants, the endangered black rhino, and 91 other species of mammal. Etosha is especially popular with photographers in the dry season who flock to the waterholes (along with the wildlife). Etosha doesn’t offer scheduled game drives, it’s a self-drive safari experience.

8. Loango National Park (Gabon)

Loango National Park in Gabon is probably the least well known park on this list but it’s only a matter of time before it’s discovered. Loango is the only place in Africa where you can see whales, chimps,gorillas and elephants in one park. In Loango you get to enjoy watching wildlife on the beach, savannah, swamp and forest in a single day.

9. Ngorongoro Conservation Area (Tanzania)

The Ngorongoro Conservation area in Tanzania includes the world’s largest crater which acts as a natural enclosure for almost every species of wildlife found in East Africa. The Maasai still live within the conservation area, and it’s also home to Olduvai where some of man’s earliest remains have been found.

10. Hwange National Park (Zimbabwe)

Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe is a personal favorite of mine because of its abundance of giraffes, elephants, and lions as well as 105 other mammal species. Hwange also has one of the largest populations of wild dogs left in Africa. There are several comfortable lodges to stay at for reasonable prices. The park is close to one of the world’s greatest natural wonders — the Victoria Falls.

The Earth Safari Team

www.theearthsafari.com

Categories: Africa, Botswana, Conservation, earth, Eco tourism, Gabon, Holiday, Kenya, Namibia, Nature, photography, Safari, South Africa, Tanzania, Tourism, Travel, Uganda, Uncategorized, Wildlife, Zambia, Zimbabwe | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Most Photographed Places on Earth

What is the most photographed place on earth? The question is of course impossible to answer and one can only muster a guess. Countless places lay claim to being the most photographed place in the world, including Paris, The Taj Mahal, Walt Disney World, Niagara Falls, Angkor Wat, the Acropolis to name just a small handful.

The only thing that is widely accepted, is that the Sun is the most photographed object (sunsets and sunrises seem to be universally irresistible). But sticking to “planet earth”, let’s take a look at some of the most photographed subjects around the world. Judge for yourself if you consider them “photogenic”.

Here is a checklist of sorts, for people, places and things to photograph on your travels. Some of them are famous, while others may seem a little odd. Either way, whether it’s a bridge or a toilet, some places get all the photographic glory! (Please keep in mind there is no way to verify the following claims.)

■The Africa “Big Five” (lion, leopard, elephant, rhino, buffalo) are considered the most photographed animals in the world.
■La Digue island in the Seychelles claims to be the most photographed island in the world.
■Santorini is the most photographed island in Greece often considered the most photographed island in Europe.
■The Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta is considered to be the most photographed event in the world.
■Table Mountain is the most photographed landmark in South Africa.
■Den Lille Havfrue (the little mermaid) from Copenhagen is the most photographed statue in the world.
■The Golden Gate Bridge is the most photographed US landmark, and most photographed bridge in the world.
■Designed by Frederick Hundertwasser, the Kawakawa public toilets in New Zealand are the most photographed toilets in the world!
■Neuschwanstein castle in Germany claims to be the most photographed castle in the world.
■The Eiffel Tower Paris is considered the most photographed structure in Europe.
■The Evangeline Oak in Louisiana and the Lone Cyprus tree in California are each touted as the most photographed tree in the world.
■Ayers Rock is the most photographed sunset in Australia.
■Abbey Road is often considered the most photographed street in the world.

■Niagara Falls may be the most photographed waterfall in the world.

The Earth Safari Team

www.theearthsafari.com

Categories: beautiful, earth, Holiday, knowledge, Nature, photography, Safari, Tourism, Travel, Uncategorized, Wildlife, world | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Top 10 Eco-lodges in the World

Chumbe Island Coral Park, Tanzania
This spectacular eco-lodge on Chumbe, a coral-island ecosystem about 12km south of Zanzibar Town, features seven bungalows that overhang the sea. The Coral Park is pretty damn close to paradise with its 3km sandbar, pristine ocean swells, baobab trees and giant coconut crabs. The bungalows are solar-powered, the toilets are composting and the cuisine is a mix of African, Indian and Middle Eastern. Solitude is guaranteed, given that the island is privately managed and only 14 guests are allowed on at a time.Chumbe Island Coral Park, Tanzania
Turtle island eco-lodge, Fiji
This eco-lodge is consistently ranked among the world’s best, not least for its pampered service: there are around 150 staff members for 14 couples maximum. Some say this equates to ‘ecohedonism’ but many more don’t care, as long as the environment gets some tender loving care. The island itself is just 500 acres, with natural springs that provide water for the lodge’s organic garden, and you can trek among black volcanic cliffs or frolic along the picture-perfect coral reefs. The latter may look familiar: Brooke Shields herself (or rather, her body double) frolicked naked here in The Blue Lagoon (1980).
Alandaluz Hosteria, Ecuador
If this place were any more self-sufficient it could operate as a base station on Mars. Sitting pretty on the beach, Alandaluz Hosteria is a model for green building practices. It’s mainly constructed from replenishable materials such astagua-palm leaves, and it features a host of organic gardens from which much of the guests’ food requirements are sourced. Compost bogs and treated waste mean that Alandaluz recovers a staggering 90%of all water used; treated water goes on to be used for irrigation.
Basata, Egypt
Basata means ‘simplicity’, and Basata is simplicity itself. Located on the Red Sea, near Nuweiba, Basata is also clean, green and beautiful, surrounded by the Sinai mountains. Littering is strictly forbidden, everything is recycled, and public displays of affection are frowned upon in favour of a community-based family atmosphere. And the accommodation? Bamboo huts and villas on the beach hold a maximum of 250 guests and face perfect coral reefs and blue waters.
Nikita’s, Russia
Located smack bang in the middle of Lake Baikal is Olkhon, the world’s second-largest freshwater island. And smack bang in the middle (or thereabouts) of Olkhon is Nikita’s, a homestead consisting of wooden houses heated by wood fires and accompanied by lovely old banya (steam baths). Nikita’s hosts will tell you all about Olkhon’s fragile environment and how it’s important to not collect wild flowers, kill butterflies or drive cars all over the shop. They’ll also guide you on ecotours around the island.
Daintree eco-lodge, Australia
This eco-lodge has won awards mainly for its wonderful location, surrounded by tropical rainforest more than a million years old. It also has 15 rustic villas, interesting culinary offerings (bush tucker blended with upmarket modern Australian stylings), and a vigorous range of activities (such as snorkelling and diving around the Great Barrier Reef ). The trickles and splashes of the waterfalls provide a pleasing soundtrack.
Costa Rica Arenal Hotel, Costa Rica
Costa Rica is becoming synonymous with the concept of ecotourism and the Arenal Hotel upholds the standard. Its location is a doozy: in the Northern Pacific mountains, with a much-vaunted view across to Volcán Arenal, Lago Coter and Laguna de Arenal. The hotel touts its ‘policy of interaction’ with the local Maleku people as an attraction, and certainly the chance to learn and understand an indigenous culture from the people who actually live it is a special bonus.
Blumau Hot Springs Village, Austria
The late ‘organic architect’ and environmentalist Friedensreich Hundertwasser designed this hot-springs village in Styria, Austria, with ecological imperatives firmly at the forefront. The village’s composting toilets feed waste to its roof gardens, a process illuminated by Hundertwasser himself. ‘Shit turns into earth,’ he wrote, ‘which is put on the roof/it becomes lawn, forest, garden/shit becomes gold. The circle is closed, there is no more waste. Shit is our soul’. In the end no one pooh-poohed Hundertwasser’s idea, allowing the Blumau Hot Springs Village to open to an enthusiastic reception.
Tree House, Kerala, India
Part of the Green Magic Nature Resort in Kerala, this ecofriendly accommodation is not for acrophobes: it’s 27m above the earth and access is by a bamboo lift counterbalanced by water. The rooms are open plan, of course, and airy and light, naturally. There are two levels, hosting one couple to each, so it’s a fairly low-key scene. The views are awesome each way you turn.
Chalalan Lodge, Bolivia
This eco-lodge in Madidi National Park is fully operated and owned by the Quechua people, who lead tours of discovery, teaching tourists the rich heritage of indigenous culture as well as the secrets of the surrounding rainforest and its multitude of inhabitants. As for the lodge itself, it was constructed using traditional methods; waste water is treated and solar power is a feature.
The Earth Safari Team
Categories: Conservation, Eco tourism, Holiday, hotels, India, Indian, lodges, Nature, resorts, Tourism, Travel, Uncategorized, Wild India, Wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Best places to spot Tigers in India

Tiger is one the most beautiful wildlife creators of India that has always pulled the attentions many national ad international wildlife photographers. For years, India has been considered the home to the tiger and today it has some of the world’s best tiger reserve parks that you must explore if you really want to capture this beautiful creator within your camera. So, if you are planning for wildlife adventure and want to see tigers in its natural habitat, here are some of the best options and tiger reserve national parks that you can or must visit at least once in your lifetime: Jim Corbett National Park – Situated very close to Nainital and Bijnore districts, Corbett National Park is one of the oldest national parks in India. Renowned for its tiger preservation, this park has always been the popular choice among wildlife tourists. Comprising of 512.8 km area and featuring marshy depressions and grasslands, this destination provides you opportunity to view tigers in its most natural habitat. In fact, the other key highlights of touring to Corbett National Park are here you can also enjoy viewing of leopards, gharials, forest cats along with long-nosed crocodiles. If you are planning to visit this park, there are lots of ways to get to the park. With a distance of 50Kms, Phoolbagh airport is the nearest airport. Though you may also reach, travelling by road, as the Corbett National Park is well connected to the nearby states as well.

Ranthambore National Park– Situated hardly at a distance of 14 kilometers from Sawai Madhopur district, Rajasthan , Ranthambore national park is yet another famous tiger reserve park and home to India’s national animal. It is one of the best places in India to view these majestic predators. Nevertheless, while visiting to this national park you may also enjoy viewing other kinds of cats found in this national park, such as – Leopard, Caracal and the Jungle Cat. However, this park is also considered as home to India’s largest antelopes, Sambhar, Chital, Chinkara and Nilgai. The best time to visit this national park is between October to March. Adding to this, the best way to reach this Ranthambore Park is by train from the Sawaimadhopur Railway station, which is just about 12 km from this park. You may even fly to the nearest Jaipur airport and then drive to Ranthambore.

Bandhavgarh National Park – Spread at the Vindhya hills in Madhya Pradesh, India, this is another national park and best known for its highest ratio of Royal Bengal Tigers. Moreover, the key feature that makes this national park different from other parks is its density of white tiger population. Apart from this, the park is also an un-spoilt national habitat for a variety of other wildlife creators such as leopard, wild boar, sloth bear and spotted dear. The most appropriate visiting season to this park is between January to April. While you can reach to this park by travelling through train, the nearest railway station to Bandhavgarh park is Katni (102 Km, Jabalpur (164 Km) and Satna (120 Km) on the central railway.

Kanha National Park – Spread almost over an area of more than 940 sq. km, the Kanha national park is situated in the Madhya Pradesh. Although best known for its tigers, the other most frequently seen animals in the park are Sambar, Leopard, Sloth Bear, Swamp Deer, Wild Boar, Jackal and Wild Dog. This park is also known for its rich vegetation that mainly comprises of Sal and Bamboo forests along with grasslands. The most ideal time to visit Kanha National Park is in the months of April to June and November to January. If you are looking forward to explore this destination, then you can easily reach here by your hiring taxi or bus as it is well connected to Jabalpur 175-kms, Nagpur 266-kms, Mukki 25-kms and Raipur 219-kms by road. Though, Jabalpur is the nearest railhead to visit the Kanha National Park. Definitely, no other place on this planet can encounter this fascinating creator in its natural habitat than India. All these reserves and national parks are well protected under Project Tiger to provide a protected and appropriate environment for the growth and survival of tigers. A visit to any of these parks will surely be a lifelong experience.

The Earth Safari Team

www.theearthsafari.com

Categories: Conservation, Eco tourism, Holiday, India, Indian, Nature, Royal Bengal Tiger, Safari, Tiger, Tourism, Travel, Uncategorized, Wild India, Wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

The Wild Wild India

India is home to a rich diversity of wildlife supplemented by an equally rich variety of flora and fauna. The sight and sounds of a majestic elephant, a peacock’s dance, the stride of a camel, the roar of a tiger are unparalleled experiences in themselves. Watching birds and animals in their natural habitats is an experience in itself.

The country offers immense opportunities for wildlife tourism. The immense heritage of wildlife in India comprises of more than 70 national parks and about 400 wildlife sanctuaries including the bird sanctuaries.

A paradise for the nature lovers, these forest areas are also crucial for the conversation of the endangered species like the Leopard, Lion, Asiatic Elephant, the Bengal tiger and Siberian Crane. Spread across the length and breadth of India, these reserves and forest areas, right from the Ranthambhore National Park in Rajasthan to the Hazaribagh Wildlife Sanctuary in Bihar, from the foothills of Himalayas, the Jim Corbett National Park to six national parks in Andaman; the Indian Wildlife circuit is an Incredible treat, unmatched by any other experience.

Elephant, Deer, Panther, Wild buffalo, Wild ass, the one horned Rhinoceros, Porcupine, Snow leopards etc are some of the animals you can sport in The Himalayan region.

India harbours eighty percent of the entire population of the one horned rhinoceros in the world. The Kaziranga National Park is an ideal habitat for the rhino and a popular destination with the naturalists and environmentalists as well as the wildlife traveller.

The Great Indian Bustard and blackbuck of the Karera Sanctuary also attract a lot of tourists. The Madhav National Park originally called the Shivpuri National Park is another rich habitat for the wildlife in close proximity to the historical town of Gwalior and being close to a often visited cultural and heritage destination enjoys its fare share of tourism inflow. The Corbett National Park one of the most popular National Parks in the northern region for the wildlife enthusiast as well as the holiday makers is changing the way wildlife tourism. These National Parks and Wildlife Sanctuaries are promoters of wildlife tourism in India.

India has its fair share of Tiger Reserves. India’s National Animal, the tiger happens to be a symbol of strength and speed. India boasts of two-dozen Tiger Reserves. The fastest mammal on Earth, the tiger happens to be the joy and pride of India. The Royal Bengal tiger is amongst the most majestic species of the tiger. Sixty percent of the total population of the wild tigers in the world resides in India. Amongst the best-known tiger reserves in India is the Bandhavgarh in Madhya Pradesh. It is often referred to as the crown in the wildlife heritage of India. Tourists at Bandhavgarh can spot Royal Bengal Tigers, cheetals, leopard, gaur, sambhar, and many more faunal species. The highly successful Project Tiger has shown once again that man can only undo in small ways the loss and destruction of natural habitat due to continuous growth and expansion of the population.

Indian wildlife has its share of native birds along with the migratory birds. Several hundred species of birds can be spotted across India. The Himalayan region is well known to be the natural habitat for the Pheasant, griffon vulture and ravens. The Keoladeo Ghana National Park popularly known as the Bharatpur Bird Sanctuary in the Indian state of Rajasthan, in close proximity of Delhi, is home to indigenous water birds, waterside birds, migratory water birds, land migratory birds, and domestic land species. Tourists from far and wide are attracted to the Bird Sanctuary. At the Dudhwa wildlife reserve migratory birds like Egrets, herons, storks and cormorants share space with the ducks, gees and teals. The region of Andaman is home for the rare species of birds like the Narcondum hornbill, Nicobar Pigeon and the Megapode.

The Earth Safari Team

www.theearthsafari.com

Categories: Conservation, Eco tourism, Holiday, India, Indian, Nature, Royal Bengal Tiger, Safari, Tiger, Tourism, Travel, Uncategorized, Wild India, Wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Travel to the Incredible India

 Grandly protruding into the Indian Ocean, India is more of a continent than a country. This subcontinent covers every topographical wonder, from white sandy island beaches and tropical forests to high deserts and soaring mountain ranges. Discover 5,000 years of human history, beginning with one of the oldest civilizations of the Indus River Valley who merged with Aryan invaders around 1500 B.C.E. to create the classic Indian culture that still thrives today. With 26 World Heritage Sites sprinkled about the country, it is easy to be immersed in the intricacies of local culture in nearly each of the 28 states and 7 territories.

Thriving Cities and Clashing Cultures: The Beauty of the North

The northern region of India is an assorted mix of cultures, traditions, languages and arts. The vulnerability of this area to outside invaders throughout history has been both a blessing and a curse, bringing with the turmoil unique external influences and inspirations. The capital city of New Delhi, with its mix of four major religions, 7 reigns of power and 2500 years of history, is a prime example of coexisting realities. Wind your way through Old Delhi and be surrounded by remnants of the Mughal Empire, including the largest mosque in India, the Jama Masjid, and Humayun’s Tomb, a 16th century landmark of breathtaking Mughal architecture that would later be echoed in the Taj Mahal. New Delhi is almost a different world with its imperial architecture and broad stately boulevards. Colonial influence is abundant since the British declared Delhi the capital during their rule. The Taj Mahal is also in the north, about 200 kilometers from Delhi. This is the most iconic demonstration of Mughal construction and should not be missed.

A Light into the Heartland: Travel India’s South

Travel to the more culturally homogenous south of India and witness thousands of years of the caste system still in practice despite the more modern structure of India’s government. With its alluring tales of trade and independence, Goa is one of the most popular destinations along the Indian coastline. Among Goa’s ancient ruins stands the Vittala Temple, a monumental tribute to the capital city of the primeval Vijayangara Empire. Most notable are the temple’s musical pillars that represent different musical instruments. Goa’s intricate architecture and independent culture are also products of 450 years of Portuguese colonial rule. In the south, the traveler will also encounter a plethora of biodiversity and protected wilderness areas. The Western Ghats Range is classified as one of the world’s biodiversity hotspots where Silent Valley National Park protects India’s last tract of virgin tropical evergreen forest.

When to Travel to India

Despite the gargantuan size of this subcontinent, there are distinct seasons during which travel anywhere in the country can be extraordinarily uncomfortable and stressful. From April to October, temperatures soar above 90F (45C) and humidity escalates to unbearable levels. October also marks the end of the monsoon season during which the southern and coastal regions are plagued with torrential downpour. The rest of the year is very pleasant and mild with consistently warm weather in the south and rather chilly evenings in the north between December and February.

The Earth Safari Team

www.theearthsafari.com

Categories: Holiday, India, india travel, Indian, Safari, Tourism, Travel, Wild India | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Royal Bengal Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris)

Tigers are the largest members of the cat family and are renowned for their power and strength. There were eight tiger subspecies at one time, but three became extinct during the 20th century. Over the last 100 years, hunting and forest destruction have reduced tiger populations from hundreds of thousands of animals to perhaps fewer than 2,500. Tigers are hunted as trophies, and also for body parts that are used in traditional Chinese medicine. All five remaining tiger subspecies are endangered, and many protection programs are in place.

Royal Bengal Tigers live in India and are sometimes called Indian tigers. They are the most common tiger and number about half of all wild tigers. Over many centuries they have become an important part of Indian tradition and lore. Tigers live alone and aggressively scent-mark large territories to keep their rivals away. They are powerful nocturnal hunters that travel many miles to find buffalo, deer, wild pigs, and other large mammals.

Tigers use their distinctive coats as camouflage (no two have exactly the same stripes). They lie in wait and creep close enough to attack their victims with a quick spring and a fatal pounce. A hungry tiger can eat as much as 60 pounds (27 kilograms) in one night, though they usually eat less. Despite their fearsome reputation, most tigers avoid humans; however, a few do become dangerous man eaters. These animals are often sick and unable to hunt normally, or live in an area where their traditional prey has vanished. Females give birth to litters of two to six cubs, which they raise with little or no help from the male. Cubs cannot hunt until they are 18 months old and remain with their mothers for two to three years, when they disperse to find their own territory.

The Earth Safari Team

www.theearthsafari.com

Categories: Eco tourism, Holiday, India, Nature, Royal Bengal Tiger, Safari, Tiger, Tourism, Travel, Uncategorized, Wild India, Wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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