Monthly Archives: April 2011

Best places to spot Tigers in India

Tiger is one the most beautiful wildlife creators of India that has always pulled the attentions many national ad international wildlife photographers. For years, India has been considered the home to the tiger and today it has some of the world’s best tiger reserve parks that you must explore if you really want to capture this beautiful creator within your camera. So, if you are planning for wildlife adventure and want to see tigers in its natural habitat, here are some of the best options and tiger reserve national parks that you can or must visit at least once in your lifetime: Jim Corbett National Park – Situated very close to Nainital and Bijnore districts, Corbett National Park is one of the oldest national parks in India. Renowned for its tiger preservation, this park has always been the popular choice among wildlife tourists. Comprising of 512.8 km area and featuring marshy depressions and grasslands, this destination provides you opportunity to view tigers in its most natural habitat. In fact, the other key highlights of touring to Corbett National Park are here you can also enjoy viewing of leopards, gharials, forest cats along with long-nosed crocodiles. If you are planning to visit this park, there are lots of ways to get to the park. With a distance of 50Kms, Phoolbagh airport is the nearest airport. Though you may also reach, travelling by road, as the Corbett National Park is well connected to the nearby states as well.

Ranthambore National Park– Situated hardly at a distance of 14 kilometers from Sawai Madhopur district, Rajasthan , Ranthambore national park is yet another famous tiger reserve park and home to India’s national animal. It is one of the best places in India to view these majestic predators. Nevertheless, while visiting to this national park you may also enjoy viewing other kinds of cats found in this national park, such as – Leopard, Caracal and the Jungle Cat. However, this park is also considered as home to India’s largest antelopes, Sambhar, Chital, Chinkara and Nilgai. The best time to visit this national park is between October to March. Adding to this, the best way to reach this Ranthambore Park is by train from the Sawaimadhopur Railway station, which is just about 12 km from this park. You may even fly to the nearest Jaipur airport and then drive to Ranthambore.

Bandhavgarh National Park – Spread at the Vindhya hills in Madhya Pradesh, India, this is another national park and best known for its highest ratio of Royal Bengal Tigers. Moreover, the key feature that makes this national park different from other parks is its density of white tiger population. Apart from this, the park is also an un-spoilt national habitat for a variety of other wildlife creators such as leopard, wild boar, sloth bear and spotted dear. The most appropriate visiting season to this park is between January to April. While you can reach to this park by travelling through train, the nearest railway station to Bandhavgarh park is Katni (102 Km, Jabalpur (164 Km) and Satna (120 Km) on the central railway.

Kanha National Park – Spread almost over an area of more than 940 sq. km, the Kanha national park is situated in the Madhya Pradesh. Although best known for its tigers, the other most frequently seen animals in the park are Sambar, Leopard, Sloth Bear, Swamp Deer, Wild Boar, Jackal and Wild Dog. This park is also known for its rich vegetation that mainly comprises of Sal and Bamboo forests along with grasslands. The most ideal time to visit Kanha National Park is in the months of April to June and November to January. If you are looking forward to explore this destination, then you can easily reach here by your hiring taxi or bus as it is well connected to Jabalpur 175-kms, Nagpur 266-kms, Mukki 25-kms and Raipur 219-kms by road. Though, Jabalpur is the nearest railhead to visit the Kanha National Park. Definitely, no other place on this planet can encounter this fascinating creator in its natural habitat than India. All these reserves and national parks are well protected under Project Tiger to provide a protected and appropriate environment for the growth and survival of tigers. A visit to any of these parks will surely be a lifelong experience.

The Earth Safari Team

www.theearthsafari.com

Categories: Conservation, Eco tourism, Holiday, India, Indian, Nature, Royal Bengal Tiger, Safari, Tiger, Tourism, Travel, Uncategorized, Wild India, Wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

The Wild Wild India

India is home to a rich diversity of wildlife supplemented by an equally rich variety of flora and fauna. The sight and sounds of a majestic elephant, a peacock’s dance, the stride of a camel, the roar of a tiger are unparalleled experiences in themselves. Watching birds and animals in their natural habitats is an experience in itself.

The country offers immense opportunities for wildlife tourism. The immense heritage of wildlife in India comprises of more than 70 national parks and about 400 wildlife sanctuaries including the bird sanctuaries.

A paradise for the nature lovers, these forest areas are also crucial for the conversation of the endangered species like the Leopard, Lion, Asiatic Elephant, the Bengal tiger and Siberian Crane. Spread across the length and breadth of India, these reserves and forest areas, right from the Ranthambhore National Park in Rajasthan to the Hazaribagh Wildlife Sanctuary in Bihar, from the foothills of Himalayas, the Jim Corbett National Park to six national parks in Andaman; the Indian Wildlife circuit is an Incredible treat, unmatched by any other experience.

Elephant, Deer, Panther, Wild buffalo, Wild ass, the one horned Rhinoceros, Porcupine, Snow leopards etc are some of the animals you can sport in The Himalayan region.

India harbours eighty percent of the entire population of the one horned rhinoceros in the world. The Kaziranga National Park is an ideal habitat for the rhino and a popular destination with the naturalists and environmentalists as well as the wildlife traveller.

The Great Indian Bustard and blackbuck of the Karera Sanctuary also attract a lot of tourists. The Madhav National Park originally called the Shivpuri National Park is another rich habitat for the wildlife in close proximity to the historical town of Gwalior and being close to a often visited cultural and heritage destination enjoys its fare share of tourism inflow. The Corbett National Park one of the most popular National Parks in the northern region for the wildlife enthusiast as well as the holiday makers is changing the way wildlife tourism. These National Parks and Wildlife Sanctuaries are promoters of wildlife tourism in India.

India has its fair share of Tiger Reserves. India’s National Animal, the tiger happens to be a symbol of strength and speed. India boasts of two-dozen Tiger Reserves. The fastest mammal on Earth, the tiger happens to be the joy and pride of India. The Royal Bengal tiger is amongst the most majestic species of the tiger. Sixty percent of the total population of the wild tigers in the world resides in India. Amongst the best-known tiger reserves in India is the Bandhavgarh in Madhya Pradesh. It is often referred to as the crown in the wildlife heritage of India. Tourists at Bandhavgarh can spot Royal Bengal Tigers, cheetals, leopard, gaur, sambhar, and many more faunal species. The highly successful Project Tiger has shown once again that man can only undo in small ways the loss and destruction of natural habitat due to continuous growth and expansion of the population.

Indian wildlife has its share of native birds along with the migratory birds. Several hundred species of birds can be spotted across India. The Himalayan region is well known to be the natural habitat for the Pheasant, griffon vulture and ravens. The Keoladeo Ghana National Park popularly known as the Bharatpur Bird Sanctuary in the Indian state of Rajasthan, in close proximity of Delhi, is home to indigenous water birds, waterside birds, migratory water birds, land migratory birds, and domestic land species. Tourists from far and wide are attracted to the Bird Sanctuary. At the Dudhwa wildlife reserve migratory birds like Egrets, herons, storks and cormorants share space with the ducks, gees and teals. The region of Andaman is home for the rare species of birds like the Narcondum hornbill, Nicobar Pigeon and the Megapode.

The Earth Safari Team

www.theearthsafari.com

Categories: Conservation, Eco tourism, Holiday, India, Indian, Nature, Royal Bengal Tiger, Safari, Tiger, Tourism, Travel, Uncategorized, Wild India, Wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Travel to the Incredible India

 Grandly protruding into the Indian Ocean, India is more of a continent than a country. This subcontinent covers every topographical wonder, from white sandy island beaches and tropical forests to high deserts and soaring mountain ranges. Discover 5,000 years of human history, beginning with one of the oldest civilizations of the Indus River Valley who merged with Aryan invaders around 1500 B.C.E. to create the classic Indian culture that still thrives today. With 26 World Heritage Sites sprinkled about the country, it is easy to be immersed in the intricacies of local culture in nearly each of the 28 states and 7 territories.

Thriving Cities and Clashing Cultures: The Beauty of the North

The northern region of India is an assorted mix of cultures, traditions, languages and arts. The vulnerability of this area to outside invaders throughout history has been both a blessing and a curse, bringing with the turmoil unique external influences and inspirations. The capital city of New Delhi, with its mix of four major religions, 7 reigns of power and 2500 years of history, is a prime example of coexisting realities. Wind your way through Old Delhi and be surrounded by remnants of the Mughal Empire, including the largest mosque in India, the Jama Masjid, and Humayun’s Tomb, a 16th century landmark of breathtaking Mughal architecture that would later be echoed in the Taj Mahal. New Delhi is almost a different world with its imperial architecture and broad stately boulevards. Colonial influence is abundant since the British declared Delhi the capital during their rule. The Taj Mahal is also in the north, about 200 kilometers from Delhi. This is the most iconic demonstration of Mughal construction and should not be missed.

A Light into the Heartland: Travel India’s South

Travel to the more culturally homogenous south of India and witness thousands of years of the caste system still in practice despite the more modern structure of India’s government. With its alluring tales of trade and independence, Goa is one of the most popular destinations along the Indian coastline. Among Goa’s ancient ruins stands the Vittala Temple, a monumental tribute to the capital city of the primeval Vijayangara Empire. Most notable are the temple’s musical pillars that represent different musical instruments. Goa’s intricate architecture and independent culture are also products of 450 years of Portuguese colonial rule. In the south, the traveler will also encounter a plethora of biodiversity and protected wilderness areas. The Western Ghats Range is classified as one of the world’s biodiversity hotspots where Silent Valley National Park protects India’s last tract of virgin tropical evergreen forest.

When to Travel to India

Despite the gargantuan size of this subcontinent, there are distinct seasons during which travel anywhere in the country can be extraordinarily uncomfortable and stressful. From April to October, temperatures soar above 90F (45C) and humidity escalates to unbearable levels. October also marks the end of the monsoon season during which the southern and coastal regions are plagued with torrential downpour. The rest of the year is very pleasant and mild with consistently warm weather in the south and rather chilly evenings in the north between December and February.

The Earth Safari Team

www.theearthsafari.com

Categories: Holiday, India, india travel, Indian, Safari, Tourism, Travel, Wild India | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Royal Bengal Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris)

Tigers are the largest members of the cat family and are renowned for their power and strength. There were eight tiger subspecies at one time, but three became extinct during the 20th century. Over the last 100 years, hunting and forest destruction have reduced tiger populations from hundreds of thousands of animals to perhaps fewer than 2,500. Tigers are hunted as trophies, and also for body parts that are used in traditional Chinese medicine. All five remaining tiger subspecies are endangered, and many protection programs are in place.

Royal Bengal Tigers live in India and are sometimes called Indian tigers. They are the most common tiger and number about half of all wild tigers. Over many centuries they have become an important part of Indian tradition and lore. Tigers live alone and aggressively scent-mark large territories to keep their rivals away. They are powerful nocturnal hunters that travel many miles to find buffalo, deer, wild pigs, and other large mammals.

Tigers use their distinctive coats as camouflage (no two have exactly the same stripes). They lie in wait and creep close enough to attack their victims with a quick spring and a fatal pounce. A hungry tiger can eat as much as 60 pounds (27 kilograms) in one night, though they usually eat less. Despite their fearsome reputation, most tigers avoid humans; however, a few do become dangerous man eaters. These animals are often sick and unable to hunt normally, or live in an area where their traditional prey has vanished. Females give birth to litters of two to six cubs, which they raise with little or no help from the male. Cubs cannot hunt until they are 18 months old and remain with their mothers for two to three years, when they disperse to find their own territory.

The Earth Safari Team

www.theearthsafari.com

Categories: Eco tourism, Holiday, India, Nature, Royal Bengal Tiger, Safari, Tiger, Tourism, Travel, Uncategorized, Wild India, Wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Forests of India

India is not only famous for its diverse wildlife, architectural marvels and culture but also for its dense and vast forest cover. Indian climate befits the variety of flora and fauna.

Forest is the second largest land use in India next to agriculture. The forest cover of India is assessed as 67.83 million hectares which constitute 20.64 per cent of the country’s geographical area, ranging from the Himalayan Temperate to Dry Zone forests. The National Forest Policy stipulates that one-third of area should be under forest or tree cover. Being a mega-biodiversity country the nation possesses high level of endemism.
The forests play vital role in harboring more than 45,000 floral and 81,000 faunal species of which 5150 floral and 1837 faunal species are endemic. The nation has established 597 Protected Areas comprising 95 National Parks, 500 Wildlife Sanctuaries 2 conservation reserves covering 1.56 million ha area or 4.75 per cent geographical area of the country.
The rising demand for forest based products and resultant deforestation and encroachment has led to a severe loss of natural resources and destruction of habitat.
India is likely to face severe shortage of supply of timber to meet its requirement from both domestic and international front. It is estimated that the demand for timber is likely to grow from 58 million cubic metres in 2005 to 153 million cubic meters in 2020. The supply of wood is projected to increase from 29 million cubic meters in 2000 to 60 million cubic meters in 2020. As a result, the nation has to heavily depend on imports for meeting its growing demand. This could result in loss of high conservation value forests or loss of biodiversity else where.
The Living Planet Report 2006 ranked India as the third highest gross foot print nation, followed by US and China. India is presently 4 th largest economy in terms of purchasing power parity and is growing at 8-9 per cent per annum. This fast growth coupled with the needs and aspirations of more than one billion people is a challenge for conservation of forests unless environmentally responsible policies are in place. In this regard, the new strategy document of the Forest programme incorporated innovative approaches such as Payment for Forest Ecosystem Services (PES), Ecological Footprint Analysis and Forest Certification.
The identified priority landscapes for field level activities for strengthening conservation of forests and biodiversity are Western Arunachal Landscape (WAL) in eastern Himalayas and South Western Ghats Landscape (SWG L) in the Western Ghats. Besides, the programme continues to provide inputs and support to conservation programmes in other priority landscapes of WWF-India, including Terai Arc Landscape, Kanchanjunga Landscape, Sundarbans landscape.
The forests of India can be classified into several types. These are – Taiga type (consisting of pines, spruce, etc.) the mixed temperate forests with both coniferous and deciduous trees, the temperate forests, the sub tropical forests, the tropical forests, and the equatorial rainforests. But there are mainly six groups of forest in India these are – moist tropical, dry tropical, montane sub tropical, montane temperate, sub alpine, and alpine.These forests have a great relation with the surrounded atmosphere. The range of forest of India is very diverse. We can find here from the rain forest of Kerala in the South to the alpine pastures of Ladakh, from the desert of Rajasthan in the west to the evergreen forest in the North East.
Rainforest:These forests belong to the tropical wet climate group characterized by high rainfall. They play the role of cooling the air. In fact it has a vital role in global climate system. It also supports a very broad array of animals, birds, reptiles etc. The North eastern part of India is famous for the rain forest. The rain forest stretch of Arunachal Pradesh is considered as one of the largest elephant zone in India, through which more than 2000 elephants migrate to Arunachal Pradesh every year.
Tropical Rain Forests: Tropical rain forests are the result of heavy rain forest. Plants like coffee, bananas, chocolate, mangoes papayas, sugar cane etc came from tropical rain forest. It is the oldest form of forest in India.
Temperate Deciduous forests: These type of forest are available in the area where there is around 100 to 200 cms annual rainfall. The deciduous is also divided into two category moist and dry. Except the western and north western region these type of forest can be found in all most all the part of India.They are found on the lower slopes of the Siwalik Hills from Jammu to the West Bengal in the east. These forests include trees like sal and teak, mango, bamboo and rose wood. The dry deciduous forests are available in the Northern and Southern part of the India except in the North East. Madhya Pradesh, Gujrat, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu are home to dry deciduous forest, which include sandalwood, khair, mahua, mango, jackfruit, wattle, bamboo, semal, sisasm, arjun, sisam etc.
Dry deciduous forests: These are found throughout the northern part of the country except in the Forest are irreplaceable and they provide shelter to many animals, reptiles, mammals, insects, birds and so many other things. The vast range of national park and wild life sanctuaries in India bear the witness of the rich lush green forest of India. For better crops and more rainfall more forest is always required. But now a days deforestation is one of the acute issue of global warming. So, the Government of India has a special measure for plantation of trees to cater this issue. Earth’s largest productive ecosystem is FOREST and we should SAVE FOREST.The Earth Safari Teamwww.theearthsafari.com

Categories: Eco tourism, India, Nature, Tourism, Travel, Uncategorized, Wild India, Wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tips for Travel in India

India is among the most colorful nations of the world and boasts of a rich history, culture and heritage. To get the most of your trip to India, it would be a good idea to equip yourself with useful information before you set out for a journey of a lifetime.

Getting In and Out

•To explore India, you need a valid passport and visa to India. Carry them at all times while enjoying a vacation in India. Notify your country’s embassy or consulate in case your passport is stolen or lost.
•One needs additional permits to go to certain destinations in India such as Andaman Islands, Gujarat, Ladakh, Kerala, and more. Check with your travel agent or embassy while planning your visit.
•15-Day visa extensions are granted under exceptional circumstances. If you intend to stay longer than 3 months on non-tourist visas there is a registration requirement. This registration makes the bearer eligible for domestic ticket prices.

Getting Around and About

 •Most cities have means of efficient local transportation such as taxis, auto rickshaws, cycle rickshaws, and buses. Private cabs can also be hired.
•It is important to carry an International Driving License if you wish to drive on your own.
•For inter-city and inter-state transport you can avail services of Indian Railways and domestic airlines. Buses, taxis and cabs also ferry people across cities and states.

Climate

 •It is best to visit Indian plains during cooler months from November to March.
•For a visit to mountainous regions of India, the months of April to October are better suited.

Food and Health

•Indian cuisine is a tad too spicy for European and American taste buds. Indulge in the gastronomical delights only if you have the stomach for it. Also, there are plenty of non-spicy cuisines and delicacies to choose from.
•You may occasionally need insect repellent cream. If you are allergic to dust, be sure to carry medication with you. Sunscreen is another must-have.

Smart Shopping

•Bargaining is the norm in local bazaars selling products without a written price. Resist the urge to buy without comparing prices from shops selling similar stuff.
•Be wary of roadside peddlers trying to sell you semi-precious and precious gems and jewelry. Visit state emporia and the Central Cottage Industries Emporia (most major cities have one) for fixed prices and a fair idea of the cost with a regular dealer.
•Trading in ivory, fur, animal skins, antiquities and the like is illegal. If you must have it, obtain a certificate of legitimate sale and permission for export before leaving the country.

Social Decorum

•Public display of affection is not appreciated and neither is public nudity unless perhaps one is at a beach.
•One is expected to cover the head before entering a religious place such as a temple or mosque.
•Ask for permission before clicking pictures of women and religious complexes. Some places charge for taking pictures while it is prohibited at a few places as well.

Do’s and Don’ts

•Do carry attested photocopies of your travel documents and keep the originals in a safely locked baggage.
•Do fill up a Currency Declaration Form along and a Disembarkation Card besides making an oral declaration of the luggage you are carrying.
•Do not smoke in public places.
•Do not give money to beggars.

The Earth Safari Team

www.theearthsafari.com

Categories: Holiday, India, Tourism, Travel, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Responsible Ecotourism

Ecotourism (also known as ecological tourism) is travel to fragile, pristine, and usually protected areas that strive to be of low impact and (often) small scale. It helps educate the traveler; provides funds for conservation; directly benefits the economic development and political empowerment of local communities; and fosters respect for different cultures and for human rights.

Responsible Eco tourism is not only a good sounding word but also carries a deeper meaning. When it comes to wildlife, the beauty and the nature comes to the mind at once. It becomes the moral responsibility f all nature lovers esp. those visiting the ecological jungle to promote security, growth and beauty of the region.

It is also concerned with promoting the economies of the nearby regions of the national parks and sanctuaries. All the nearby populations who survive on the economy from the natural habitats are to be paid special care and attention by the government authorities and also by the tourists coming fro diverse global locations.

Eco-tourism focuses on local cultures, wilderness adventures, volunteering, personal growth and learning new ways to live on our vulnerable planet. It is typically defined as travel to destinations where the flora, fauna, and cultural heritage are the primary attractions. Responsible Eco-tourism includes programs that minimize the adverse effects of traditional tourism on the natural environment, and enhance the cultural integrity of local people. Therefore, in addition to evaluating environmental and cultural factors, initiatives by hospitality providers to promote recycling, energy efficiency, water reuse, and the creation of economic opportunities for local communities are an integral part of Eco-tourism.

How can we promote Eco tourism, by Minimizing impact

•  Build environmental and cultural awareness and respect

•  Provide positive experiences for both visitors and hosts

•  Provide direct financial benefits for conservation

•  Provide financial benefits and empowerment for local people

•  Raise sensitivity to host countries’ political, environmental, and social climate

•  Support international human rights and labor agreements.

The Earth Safari Team

www.theearthsafari.com

Categories: Conservation, Eco tourism, Holiday, India, Nature, Safari, Tourism, Travel, Uncategorized, Wild India, Wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Welcome to Wild India

Welcome to the land of Variety, welcome to India. India is a diverse ecosystem where thousands of varied flora and fauna co-exist just like its diverse culture, heritage, languages and what not. Indian Wildlife is never too different.
India is a land with 26 amazing World Heritage Sites, 13 Ramsar Sites  (plus Six New ) and 13 Biosphere Reserves, India is indeed a paradise. In addition to its birds and animals, India also boasts of over 20,000 species of insects, 2,000 species of butterfly, 142 species of frogs and over 700 species of fish. This makes India a wildlife heaven and also the ultimate destination for wildlife enthusiasts and lovers.
We as a team with an expertise in providing the best information, suggestions and a vast experience in the Indian Wildlife are dedicated to all the nature and wildlife lovers of the world and invite them to come to India to capture the magic of wild in their memories and camera for the life. We offer customized wildlife tour and safari packages that sit your interest, your living conditions, your budget and also the level of your thrill.
We have identified the richest natural history destinations and carefully developed itineraries that maximize wildlife and cultural experiences for you. We have brought together selection of the finest natural history, cultural and and adventure tours and trips
You are invited to come and join us for the most unforgettable times of your life through the Safari and tours of the Indian Wildlife where you may encounter the most shy to fiercest animals of the jungle. Your journey never stops at the wild also, you can accompany us to the nearby places which are famous for their own charm.

The Earth Safari Team

www.theearthsafari.com

Categories: Holiday, India, India Wildlife Safari, Indian Wildlife, Nature, Safari, Tourism, Travel, Uncategorized, Wild India, Wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Blog at WordPress.com. The Adventure Journal Theme.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 683 other followers